FOR REVIEW AND PREVIEW PURPOSES ONLY. Ryan Reynolds in a scene from the movie Deadpool. Supplied by Fox Australia. Please photo to Joe Lederer.

TM & © 2015 Marvel & Subs.  TM and © 2015 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.  All rights reserved.  Not for sale or duplication.
FOR REVIEW AND PREVIEW PURPOSES ONLY. Ryan Reynolds in a scene from the movie Deadpool. Supplied by Fox Australia. Please photo to Joe Lederer. TM & © 2015 Marvel & Subs.  TM and © 2015 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.  All rights reserved.  Not for sale or duplication. Joe Lederer

Why I won't be seeing Deadpool 2

IRONIC pop cultural references and cheesy 1980s tongue-in-cheek soundtrack? Check.

Superheroes wearing ridiculous latex costumes with wicked martial arts' skills? Check.

A unique main character with a compelling backstory; the underdog we all love? Check.

Sounds like a great movie, but despite all these great elements I still l won't be venturing to the cinema to watch Deadpool 2.

Unlike all the fans raving about the jaw-dropping "coolness” of this new film, there's one thing about it I literally cannot stomach.

And that's the extremely gratuitous violence embedded into the very DNA of the movie.

That, at least to me, is simply not cool. It's a turn off. It's sickening.

I've considered this for a long time. Would Deadpool be as popular if it wasn't so violent?

And I've come to the sad conclusion that it wouldn't be.

If Deadpool had all the other elements but featured "only” Avengers level violence, I predict it wouldn't have been half as cool.

All those fanboys and girls out there seem to have a lust for it.

What makes it worse to me Deadpool is that the film mixes the violence with an attitude of comedic disdain. That doubles it's toxicity, in my mind.

There's something about the extreme violence mixed in a cocktail with all the other clever comedy that turns people on.

But to me it means while we're all laughing at the jokes, we're becoming numb to the gore.

It just doesn't seem so bad anymore.

You can hardly blame Ryan Reynolds, he just sees what people wanted. He's just delivering it.

There's a history to this kind of cinematic violence.

I was a big fan of Quentin Tarantino back in his heyday in the days of Reservoir Dogs, True Romance, and the Pulp Fiction.

I loved those films. But I have to admit, Tarantino was one of the pioneers of this kind of extreme yet tongue-in-cheek violence.

By the time he got around to making his Kill Bill series, I could barely watch them anymore.

It felt like someone was shaking you up and down, punching you in the fact, stabbing you in the gut, in some vain attempt at stimulation. And then making you laugh.

Plus, I have children now.

In the last 20 years we've seen arise of hyper realistic video games and computer generated imagery, and our acceptance of gratuitous violence in entertainment has undoubtedly risen to keep pace with what our minds can dream up.

I simply don't want my kids to become numb to this stuff like I once was.

That's why I can't in good conscience watch a film like Deadpool 2.

I'm a sucker for so much about the film, but this is one threshold I'm not willing to cross.