CATS 1, DOGS 0: Strict pet laws won't cover felines

18th May 2017 1:00 PM
UPDATED 5:36 PM
"Feral cats are breeding more and more powerful cats": RSPCA. "Feral cats are breeding more and more powerful cats": RSPCA.

STRICT incoming laws limiting dog owners from breeding their animals won't be extended to cats.

The State Government passed legislation last year introducing new requirements for dog owners which take effect on May 26.

The raft of new rules include a requirement for any dog owner who breeds, even once, to register.

But, the government says, that reform won't be imposed on cat owners as a means to tackle the growing issue of feral cats, although it hasn't been ruled out entirely.

A Biosecurity spokesperson said the Dog Registration system would need to be introduced and monitored for efficacy before a similar system was considered for other animals, such as cats.

"The Queensland Government is not currently considering introducing cat breeder registration," the spokesperson said.

"Responsible pet owners generally de-sex cats that are not intended for breeding.

"We recommend that you have cats and dogs desexed if they are not intended to be kept for breeding.

"This prevents an unwanted litter and helps to reduce the number of animals that have to be euthanised. Most council areas offer incentives to desex cats and dogs."

RSPCA spokesperson Michael Beatty said if the same new laws were applied to cat owners, it would unlikely have a significant impact. 

"Anything that could help bring down the number of unwanted cats would be a good idea, but whether or not that type of legislation is the right type to cover cats; we're not sure," Mr Beatty said. 

"You don't get quite the same issues with cats as we do with huge puppy farms. Issues with large numbers of cats tend to be more of a hoarder type situation and we are often called to those jobs because of deplorable conditions. 

"Feral cats are breeding more and more powerful cats which is a major issue, and part of the problem is people will just dump a litter of unwanted cats in the bush.

"The most powerful and smartest of those cats are the ones that survive then breed with other powerful and smart cats.

 "It would be lovely if everyone just had their cats desexed and kept inside."

Ipswich City Council no longer requires cats to be registered, as of July 2016, but there are restrictions on how many cats can be kept on a property without a permit.

Ipswich residents are allowed to keep up to two cats on a regular sized property before having to obtain a permit from the council.