The father of a 29-year-old woman who impersonated Home and Away star Lincoln Lewis to torment strangers has clashed with reporters outside a Melbourne court.

Lydia Abdelmalek appeared at the County Court for an appeal against her imprisonment this morning.

She was sentenced to two years and eight months jail earlier this month but granted bail to appeal.

The Melbourne woman was found guilty of six counts of stalking after it was revealed she told numerous women she was Lewis, tricked them into thinking they were in a relationship with the soap star and then threatened them.

Reporter Paul Dowsley and Lydia Abdelmalek’s father clashed earlier today. Picture: Ellen Smith/AAP
Reporter Paul Dowsley and Lydia Abdelmalek’s father clashed earlier today. Picture: Ellen Smith/AAP


On one occasion she told a victim to kill herself. That woman, known only as Emma, took her own life last year.

Abdelmalek's hearing was adjourned until October next year. She will remain free until then.

Outside court, Abdelmalek's father used a large umbrella to shield his daughter from cameras. But in the process he clashed with photographers and journalists.

10 News First journalist Candice Wyatt tweeted that Abdelmalek "came out of court attacking media crews".

9 News journalist Eliza Rugg described the scenes as "ugly". "The father of catfish cyber-stalker Lydia Abdelmalek has attacked media with an umbrella," she wrote.

7 News journalist Paul Dowsley can be seen in the footage being pushed by Abdelmalek's father.

"Why did you push me over?" he asks. Mr Abdelmalek responds: "Don't touch it."

Dowsley asked Abdelmalek if she was sorry or wanted to apologise to her victims but she did not respond.

Later, as Abdelmalek is inside the car, Abdelmalek's father uses the umbrella as a weapon, thrusting it towards the reporter.

"Don't push me mate," Dowsley tells him. Mr Abdelmalek responds: "Don't be in my way."

Abdelmalek, who gripped a photograph of Lewis during her sentencing at the Heidelberg Magistrates' Court earlier this month, convinced strangers to send her revealing photographs of themselves after tricking them into thinking they were talking to Lewis.

After the story emerged in April, Lewis warned his followers about the dangers of social media.

Lydia Abdelmalek glares at photographers and journalists as she leaves the County Court. Picture: Ellen Smith/AAP
Lydia Abdelmalek glares at photographers and journalists as she leaves the County Court. Picture: Ellen Smith/AAP


In a series of tweets, he wrote: "Having your number, address, personal details illegally obtained & photos doctored was scary.

"Having them used to catfish people is sickening. But nothing can give back or make right what this sick person did and took away from the victims."

He said anyone, "especially those with kids, KNOW who they are talking to online".

"Be absolutely sure of it. Social media can be great but also a scary place as there are sick twisted people out there," he wrote.

Abdelmalek previously told news.com.au she was keen to "rectify the situation" and tell her side of the story.

"Would absolutely love to give my side of the story and rectify the whole situation and give an account of the whole story letting people know the truth," she said via Facebook Messenger in April.

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